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Aberrant Left Internal Iliac Artery Originating from the Aortic Bifurcation
J Acute Care Surg 2018;8:78−79
Published online October 30, 2018;  https://doi.org/10.17479/jacs.2018.8.2.78
© 2018 Korean Society of Acute Care Surgery.

Chan Yong Park

Department of Trauma Surgery, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan, Korea
Chan Yong Park, M.D. Department of Trauma Surgery, Pusan National University Hospital, 179 Gudeok-ro, Seo-gu, Busan 49241, Korea Tel: +82-51-240-7369, Fax: +82-51-240-7719, E-mail: traumawkuh@gmail.com ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5111-3270
Received May 23, 2018; Accepted August 2, 2018.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Body

The internal iliac artery mostly originates from the common iliac artery. We report a case of the aberrant left internal iliac artery directly originating from the aortic bifurcation site. A 73-year-old female presented to the emergency department via another hospital due to pelvic fracture. Emergent angiography was performed for control of the pelvic bleeding. Angiography showed both normal common iliac arteries and aberrant left internal iliac artery originating from aortic bifurcation (Fig. 1). This was also observed in computed tomography (Fig. 2). To our knowledge, this is the first report about this type of anomaly in the literature. Aberrant internal iliac artery originating from aortic bifurcation is an extremely rare vascular variation [1,2]. During the radiologic intervention for trauma patients, the possibility of various vascular abnormalities should be considered.

Fig. 1.

In angiography, the left internal iliac artery is directly originated from the aorta.


Fig. 2.

The left internal iliac artery is directly branched from the aorta.


Conflicts of Interest

No potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported.

References
  1. Koyama T, Kawada T, Kitanaka Y, Katagiri K, Ohno M, and Ikeshita M et al. Congenital anomaly of the external iliac artery:a case report. J Vasc Surg 2003;37:683-5.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  2. Hager E, Isenberg G, Gonsalves C, Moudgill N, Dong S, and Dimuzio P. A new anatomic variant of the aorta:a case report. J Vasc Surg 2008;48:213-5.
    Pubmed CrossRef


October 2018, 8 (2)
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